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Periodic Table of Content Marketing free download

La tavola periodica del Content Marketing (scarica gratis l’infografica)

Dopo la SEO e Google Analytics, è giunto il momento del Content Marketing. Ultimamente le tavole periodiche sono davvero di moda per fornire una panoramica (quasi completa) di importanti settori del digital marketing.

Chris Lake ha da poco rilasciato la prima versione della sua tavola, in realtà un’infografica orizzontale pubblicata dal  Econsultancy.

La Tavola Periodica del Content Marketing, di Chris Lake – scarica gratis (immagine in formato png)

La Tavola Periodica del Content Marketing - scarica gratis

 

La tavola non è definitiva (come informa anche l’autore) ma del resto anche l’ambiente a cui fa riferimento è soggetto a frequenti cambiamenti, talvolta radicali, che non consentono di costruire rappresentazioni valide per periodi medio/lunghi. Tuttavia, la tavola è un’interessante panoramica che può fungere anche da check list delle attività di Content Marketing condotte a qualsiasi scala.

I suoi elementi sono stati divisi in 8 aree principali:

  1. Strategia
  2. Formato
  3. Tipo di Contenuto
  4. Piattaforma
  5. Metriche
  6. Obiettivi
  7. Condivisioni
  8. Lista di controllo

Si può dire che sia completa?

 

Periodic Table of Content Marketing free download

The periodic table of Content Marketing: free infographic download

YAPT! (=Yet Another Periodic Table!)

After SEO and Google Analytics, it is time for Content Marketing. Recently periodic tables have become a very fashionable way to provide an (almost complete) overview of digital topics.

Content is king after all – many expert keep on saying – and Chris Lake has just built its periodic table, an interesting infographic published by Econsultancy.

The Periodic Table of Content Marketing, by Chris Lake – free download (png image)

The Periodic Table of Content Marketing - free download

 

The author stated that the table is far from being definitive – the whole environment is affected by frequent changes after all – but it seems a very good overview/check list of such important area for all (digital) marketers.

Its elements have been divided into 8 main areas:

  1. Strategy
  2. Format
  3. Content Type
  4. Platform
  5. Metrics
  6. Goals
  7. Sharing Triggers
  8. Checklist

Can we say “that’s all folks”?

 

periodic table of google analytics

Google Analytics under a chemical perspective: the periodic table (free pdf download)

Can periodic tables be considered infographics? Whatever your answer is, what I am going to present here reminds me of the SEO periodic table published some time ago (and constantly updated).
It is an useful overview that can help beginners to spot whatever has not been considered into their work/analysis/knowledge. 
Have a look at the elements of such an interesting visual guide about Google Analytics main features seen from a ‘chemical’ perspective. It has been made and published by the certified GA expert Jeff Sauer @ Jeffalytics.
GA elements have been splitted into four main categories: Product, Metrics, Reports, and Features.
Are you aware of all its elements? Anything missing?

Little update – On 20th Feb Google Analytics has  redesigned its UI again. Accounts are now listed on a dropdown menu placed in the top right corner.

Google Tag Manager

Event Tracking Automation for Google Tag Manager: downloads, outbound links, email, podcasts

Update: with GTM v2 many things changed. You can have a look at a comprehensive article by Simo Ahava on how to setup event tracking on Google Tag Manager.


Google Tag Manager

Are you using Google Tag Manager? Great. There’s a way to automate the process of attributing GA Events to ALL your outbound links, downloads, email addresses, even podcasts and phone numbers with no effort, no further scripting needed on your code.

Here I will explain how to do it. A huge credit goes to Ryan @ Blastam that not long ago has written this interesting article with guidelines to automate the process on Google Analytics.

Step 0: GTM IN PLACE + JQUERY!

Open a GTM account and install the code immediately after the opening <body> tag of your website (just in case…)

Be sure to have jQuery JavaScript library working on your site (most CMS already have it, check HTML if you are not sure, it does not have to be the last version).

If jQuery is not installed… don’t worry, we can still do it (see Step 3).

 

Step 1: RULES

Create the general All Pages rule if not already present

url matches RegEx .*

Create another rule that I call Activate Outbound

event equals outbound

Add a rule to tell when GTM has to flash a Tag

Add a rule to tell when GTM has to flash a Tag

Step 2: MACROS

Create the following three  JavaScript Variable:

Name: CategoryGlobal Variable Name: cat
Name: Action; Global Variable Name: act
Name: Label; Global Variable Name: lab

Step 3: TAGS

Create two tags, one for the event tracking and another one for the magic script

Event tracking will be as follow:

GA Event Tracking on Google Tag Manager

GA Event Tracking on Google Tag Manager

(remember to add your GA account code)

The Firing Rule will be Activate Outbound (the one set in Step 1)

Now let’s add the following Script on a new Custom HTML Tag

ONLY if the jQuery library is not on loaded on your site add the following line BEFORE the main code:

<script src=”//code.jquery.com/jquery-1.7.2.js”></script>

If jQuery was already present on your pages then ignore the above code and proceed just adding what follows:

<script type="text/javascript">
if (typeof jQuery != 'undefined') {
 jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
 var filetypes = /.(zip|exe|dmg|pdf|doc.*|xls.*|ppt.*|mp3|txt|rar|wma|mov|avi|wmv|flv|wav)$/i;
 var baseHref = '';
 if (jQuery('base').attr('href') != undefined) baseHref = jQuery('base').attr('href');

 jQuery('a').on('click', function(event) {
 var el = jQuery(this);
 var track = true;
 var href = (typeof(el.attr('href')) != 'undefined' ) ? el.attr('href') :"";
 var isThisDomain = href.match(document.domain.split('.').reverse()[1] + '.' + document.domain.split('.').reverse()[0]);
 if (!href.match(/^javascript:/i)) {
 var elEv = []; elEv.value=0, elEv.non_i=false;
 if (href.match(/^mailto:/i)) {
 cat = "email";
 act = "click";
 lab = href.replace(/^mailto:/i, '');
 elEv.loc = href;
 }
 else if (href.match(filetypes)) {
 var extension = (/[.]/.exec(href)) ? /[^.]+$/.exec(href) : undefined;
 cat = "download";
 act = "click-" + extension[0];
 lab = href.replace(/ /g,"-");
 elEv.loc = baseHref + href;
 }
 else if (href.match(/^https?:/i) && !isThisDomain) {
 cat = "outbound";
 act = "click";
 lab = href.replace(/^https?:///i, '');
 elEv.non_i = true;
 elEv.loc = href;
 }
 else if (href.match(/^tel:/i)) {
 cat = "telephone";
 act = "click";
 lab = href.replace(/^tel:/i, '');
 elEv.loc = href;
 }
 else track = false;

 if (track) {
 dataLayer.push({'event':'trackoutbound'});

 if ( el.attr('target') == undefined || el.attr('target').toLowerCase() != '_blank') {
 setTimeout(function() { location.href = elEv.loc; }, 400);
 return false;
 }
 }
 }
 });
 });
}
</script>
 

Step 4: SAVE AND PUBLISH!

Always save after each step taken and at the end Save a new container version and Publish – you can even preview and debug it to check if all tags are firing on the right place (or after the right event).

Is it working?

To check the implementation just go on your website, click on an external link or email or pdf download and at the same time on another browser window check your Google Analytics Real-Time reports on the Events section. You should see, after a few seconds, your event correctly appearing. Later, Events will be properly recorded also under GA Content section and you can create any kind of report/advanced segment/goal with them.

 

Monitor real-time events on GA

Monitor real-time events on GA

Important: to make it work you need jQuery library to be loaded before the above mentioned scripts. So if you don’t have it, download, load on your server and call in the header section. Or you can still avoid this implementation and manually tag each single link/download the old way.

A note: you can change name of variables, rules, tags and macro, but consider to adapt the whole implementation accordingly.

Why it is useful

For example you can measure how many downloads of a pdf enrolment form or clicks to an external website that does not have multi-domain tracking.

The good point of such implementation is that you don’t need to hardcode anything on your pages/posts: it magically does the job for you. It’s been tested on WordPress but it should work on all CMS.

Find out more about GTM…

Update: October 2013

New system to automate tracking all links and form buttons through GTM has been launched. In my view it’s a bit more complex than the above solution, and it needs more work to distinguish between different elements (e.g. a pdf from an outbound link), but it’s the new standard. Detailed post by Lunametrics here or by Justin Cutroni here.